A Powerful Argument against “Body Shaming”

 Teen Tennis Star's Success Is A Powerful Argument Against Body-Shaming

Teen Tennis Star’s Success Is A Powerful Argument Against Body-Shaming

I am beyond inspired by an 18-year-old tennis player. Taylor Townsend was told she would not be supported by the United States Tennis Association until she lost weight. She didn’t and last week the 205th-ranked player became the youngest U.S. woman to advance to the third round at the French Open since 2003. Her success speaks for itself. 

 

Women athletes come in all different sizes and shapes and colors … I think you can see that more than anywhere on the tennis tour. — Serena Williams 

 

Many Americans struggle with being overweight and overeating. And for many this issue is kept not only private, but proliferating due to body shaming, or even the fear of being judged. 

Most of us who struggle with overeating feel embarrassed when we gain weight. As a yoga instructor and group fitness instructor, I find this particularly true. 

It has been a struggle to accept myself at my current size. I didn’t gain the weight overnight, nor will I lose it overnight. And at times, I decline invitations to things I would love to do. 

Ironic that although I think body shaming ishurtful and unacceptable behavior, I do to it myself every time I turn down an opportunity. 

 

If your comfort zone is misery, it is time to get uncomfortable.  — Coach MD

 

For those of us that may be big or bigger than we want to be, let’s still think BIG about who we are, like Taylor Townsend did.

If we don’t believe in body shaming, we ought to extend that same respect to ourselves.

This one is for the woman who is heavier than ‘they’ think she should be.

This one is for the woman who is heavier than ‘they’ think she should be.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 Comments to “A Powerful Argument against “Body Shaming””

  1. I hear you, but at the same time we can’t not live our lives because of others’ judgments of us, perceived or real. I confess that when I saw one of my current yoga teachers, I passed judgment. However, her awesome cueing and practice aside, her spirit is amazing, and now I don’t think I could even recall the color of hair. I think of how she makes me feel, which is fabulous. How I love it when she says “make yourselves tall.” I’m sure you have at least the same impact on your fellow yogis and yoginis. Her presence is amazing and inspiring. Indeed, we need to give ourselves a break (so much easier said than done, I know). The weight is only a symptom of what’s going on, but you know that. Have you ever, like me, looked at photos of yourself when in fact you much thinner and remember how you felt overweight or unattractive even then? It’s truly insidious. Remember, being complicated is a wonderful thing, makes us human, and we need to embrace it. “My grace is sufficient for you, for power is made perfect in weakness.” And, as for those who pass judgment, “Do not throw your pearls before swine…” If some people cannot appreciate the depth of what you have to offer, that just reflects where they are. Struggles with weight, addictions, or whatever else make us more compassionate people, and that is why we’re here in the first place.

  2. Jeanne, thank you so much for sharing your beautiful, empowering thoughts. Yes to being complicated, human and compassionate!

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